Mostly vintage (up through 1980s) New York.

20th July 2011

Photo reblogged from Capital New York with 136 notes

capitalnewyork:

newsweek:

gillianmae:

David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms.

“The newsroom is the essential vehicle for understanding a city,  because it’s not one guy at a computer trying to figure shit out,” he  said. “It’s a newsroom full of sources, it’s a newsroom full of people  who spent half their career on a beat. When the city hall reporter is  24-years-old, you know, you ain’t going to find out what’s going on in  city hall.”
Nor is it any consolation when new-media companies hire reporters to  cater to a national audience.
Of Arianna Huffington and her 13-million-unique-visitor-a-month  Huffington Post, Simon said, “She can dabble like a dilettante in  national politics—‘I’m going to hire eight, nine people, actually pay  them a salary, maybe, call them an investigative team and loose these  eight, nine people on Washington.’ When human beings can’t find out  what’s going on in Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Trenton and  everywhere else in the United States, how does that save journalism?
“The day that there’s a bunch of Huffington Post reporters in  Baltimore, and there’s a Baltimore edition of the Huffington post, then  you know what it is? It’s a newspaper and it’s online—it’s an online  paper and it’s something to be reckoned with. But until they’re going to  be there every day and until they’re going to have 40, 50, 60,000  readers in Baltimore, concerned about the issues in Baltimore, the  Huffington Post doesn’t mean shit to the average American. It doesn’t  mean shit to people in New York if they want to find out about metro  coverage.”
For Simon, the galling thing is not that print is yielding to  online—he makes a point of saying that he has no interest in preserving  newsprint (“you know, cutting down trees”). The problem is the  disappearance of a bunch of local outlets, to be replaced by a few big  national ones.


We’d love better business minds than ours to weigh in here, but we’ve long thought that the decline in local news organizations is just the end phase of a decline that started with the death of the local department store; we assume that Huffpo’s push into local, along with Patch, etc. is basically just the journalistic equivalent of Walmart, no? 

You should really read the whole article at Capital, since David gets into the business model and how the race for as many eyeballs as possible destroyed local newsrooms.

capitalnewyork:

newsweek:

gillianmae:

David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms.

“The newsroom is the essential vehicle for understanding a city, because it’s not one guy at a computer trying to figure shit out,” he said. “It’s a newsroom full of sources, it’s a newsroom full of people who spent half their career on a beat. When the city hall reporter is 24-years-old, you know, you ain’t going to find out what’s going on in city hall.”

Nor is it any consolation when new-media companies hire reporters to cater to a national audience.

Of Arianna Huffington and her 13-million-unique-visitor-a-month Huffington Post, Simon said, “She can dabble like a dilettante in national politics—‘I’m going to hire eight, nine people, actually pay them a salary, maybe, call them an investigative team and loose these eight, nine people on Washington.’ When human beings can’t find out what’s going on in Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Trenton and everywhere else in the United States, how does that save journalism?

“The day that there’s a bunch of Huffington Post reporters in Baltimore, and there’s a Baltimore edition of the Huffington post, then you know what it is? It’s a newspaper and it’s online—it’s an online paper and it’s something to be reckoned with. But until they’re going to be there every day and until they’re going to have 40, 50, 60,000 readers in Baltimore, concerned about the issues in Baltimore, the Huffington Post doesn’t mean shit to the average American. It doesn’t mean shit to people in New York if they want to find out about metro coverage.”

For Simon, the galling thing is not that print is yielding to online—he makes a point of saying that he has no interest in preserving newsprint (“you know, cutting down trees”). The problem is the disappearance of a bunch of local outlets, to be replaced by a few big national ones.

We’d love better business minds than ours to weigh in here, but we’ve long thought that the decline in local news organizations is just the end phase of a decline that started with the death of the local department store; we assume that Huffpo’s push into local, along with Patch, etc. is basically just the journalistic equivalent of Walmart, no? 

You should really read the whole article at Capital, since David gets into the business model and how the race for as many eyeballs as possible destroyed local newsrooms.

Tagged: new yorker1970sflyover countryold new yorkvintage new york

Source: gillianmae

  1. shampainwishes reblogged this from oldnewyork
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    At first I wasn’t totally sure why the picture (which is one of my favorites and something I may need to have in poster...
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  8. bourgeoispastie reblogged this from archivedigger and added:
    old-school newsroom nostalgia warms the cockles of my heart. but, david simon, as a 21-year-old reporter, here is some...
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  11. mediation reblogged this from newsweek and added:
    gillianmae: There’s a couple quick points about this: 1. Simon was out of the news game long before the digital changes...
  12. thehardertheyfall reblogged this from bethlehems and added:
    David Simon on the doomed relationship between cities and their newsrooms. “The newsroom is the essential vehicle for...
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